THE USE OF NEW GOES-16 SATELLITE DATA FOR CONVECTION OVER THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES
Frank Alsheimer, NOAA/NWS Columbia, SC, West Columbia, SC
Brian Carcione, NOAA/NWS
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Abstract
On November 19th, 2016, the first in a new generation of geostationary weather satellites was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida. The Advanced Baseline Instrument (ABI) on the GOES-16 satellite has dramatically increased geostationary remote sensing capabilities in the Western Hemisphere. Specifically, GOES-16 has 3 times the spectral resolution, 4 times the spatial resolution, and up to 5 times the temporal resolution of previous geostationary satellites that cover the United States.

Because of the enhanced resolution mentioned above, GOES-16 data is ideal for monitoring convection. The increase in spatial resolution allows for finer details of convection initiation and convective cloud top temperature to be observed. The increase in temporal resolution allows for better observations of rapid changes in convective storm structure (such as rapidly cooling cloud top temperatures), as well as the movement of boundaries that can affect the initiation and maturation of convection. The increase in spectral resolution permits combining different spectral channels into RGB images that help bring specific items of concern (such as elevated mixed layers) into focus.

This presentation will show examples of how GOES-16 ABI Cloud and Moisture Imagery (CMI) helped NWS forecasters in the southeast monitor convective weather to provide decision support services for our customers.